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Tipping in Indonesia: The Indonesia Tipping Guide

SmarterTravel

There are no set rules for tipping in Indonesia, but there are still times when it is appropriate to leave a little extra. This Indonesia tipping guide will help you know when/how much to tip for great service.

Tipping in Indonesia

Tipping in Indonesia isn’t a standard practice, as a service charge may be added to the final bill in hotels and restaurants. If service, however, isn’t included or it exceeds all expectations, you are welcome to leave a little extra to show your gratitude and it will be appreciated. The currency in Indonesia is the rupiah (Rp) and it’s considered acceptable to round up to the nearest rupiah when in doubt on what to tip. Be sure to hand the tip directly to the person you want to thank for excellent service.

Though tipping might not a standard practice, there are general guidelines that will help ensure a stress-free vacation. This Indonesia tipping guide will help you navigate when/where you can leave a little extra for great service.

Indonesia Tipping Guide

Café Server: A tip isn’t required, but you can leave a few coins for top-notch service.

Restaurant Server: A service charge of 5 to 10 percent may be included in the final bill. If service exceeds expectations, feel free to give the server a few extra coins. If service isn’t included, leave up to 15 percent for a job well done. A tip will always be appreciated, but isn’t expected. To ensure the server receives the tip, hand the money directly to them. 

Bartender: A tip isn’t required, but you can leave a few coins for top-notch service.

Tour Guides: There is no obligation to tip a guide, but a few extra coins are a nice way to show appreciation for a memorable tour. The amount is up to you and should reflect the experience.

Taxis: It is common, but not obligatory, to round up to the nearest rupiah on a fare.

Doorman: Hotels typically include a 10 percent service charge on top of the 10 to 11 percent tax in the final bill, and therefore tipping isn’t required. You can, however, offer a few coins for exemplary service. To ensure the right employee receives your tip, hand it directly to him or her.

Bellhop: Hotels typically include a 10 percent service charge on top of the 10 to 11 percent tax in the final bill, and therefore tipping isn’t required. You can, however, give a few extra coins for delivering your luggage to your room. To ensure the right employee receives your tip, hand it directly to him or her.

Housecleaning: Hotels typically include a 10 percent service charge on top of the 10 to 11 percent tax in the final bill, and therefore tipping isn’t required. You can, however, give a few extra coins for a squeaky-clean stay. To ensure the right employee receives your tip, hand it directly to him or her. 

Concierge: Hotels typically include a 10 percent service charge on top of the 10 to 11 percent tax in the final bill, and therefore tipping isn’t required. You can, however, give a few extra coins for a special recommendation or hard-to-get reservation. To ensure the right employee receives your tip, hand it directly to him or her.

Stylist: It is common to tip 20,000Rp to 50,000Rp for great service, but you can leave extra if you really love the new look.

Spa Service Provider: The amount to tip is a personal decision, but good starting points for services include 20,000Rp for manicures and pedicures, 30,000Rp for a one-hour massage, and 25,000Rp for a facial. It is up to you if you would like to leave more or less.

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Information provided by the Ministry of Tourism Republic of Indonesia.

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