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How Do You Define ‘Being There’?

SmarterTravel

I came across an article on Huffington Post about three men from Norway who earned a Guinness World Record for passing through 19 countries in a 24-hour period. The headline caught my attention: how did they do that? But a larger question also came to mind. What is the appeal of simply stepping foot in a place? Moreover, how do you personally define having been somewhere?

Admittedly, I take pride in knowing how many places I’ve been, but I’ve experienced a day in just one destination (let alone 19) and haven’t always felt like I really saw it. Cruising, for instance, is a great way to see multiple places in a one-week vacation without ever leaving the ship, but so often time in port is limited to just a few hours. Taking that in to account, yes, I can say I visited a new place but without really knowing much about it.

So how do you define where you’ve been?

I heard a story about a couple who are on a race to visit all 50 states and their only requirement for having “been there” is to have eaten a meal there. Others consider physically stepping foot within borders to suffice, while those with stricter travel integrity might have different standards.

Is it worth it to travel by the numbers? I’ve mused on this idea before, calling people who practice obsessive country-counting “not true travelers,” but I admit the thrill of visiting a new place and pinning a map is thoroughly satisfying.

So how to accurately track past places for the history books? The Traveler’s Century Club offers a list of both countries and territories for consideration — if you have been to 100 or more you’re eligible to join the club. Other travelers go strictly by the books: Commonwealths and territories don’t count. And others may even include a few states thrown into the mix. However you divide your scrapbook or photo albums, I think the most important thing to take away is what it was like to be there — really be there. If you can’t recall what it was like to be somewhere you’ve visited, then you’re losing the entire point of travel. If you could experience the culture, history, atmosphere and eccentricities of 19 countries in one day — that would be an accomplishment.

— written by Brittany Chrusciel

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