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tipping in spain

Tipping in Spain: The Spain Tipping Guide

It is not customary to tip in most places in Spain. This Spain tipping guide will help you navigate when/where you can leave a little extra for great service.

Tipping in Spain

Tipping in Spain may not be considered customary, but there are certain places when it’s acceptable to leave a few coins. A good rule of thumb is to skip the tip at cheaper restaurants and leave up to 10 percent when service exceeds expectations in upscale dining establishments. Be aware, however, that some restaurants include service, or IVA or Impuestos sobre el Valor Añadido, in the final bill, so keep an eye out for that language at the bottom of the receipt before tipping extra. It is common for servers not to receive tips included on a credit card, so try to leave cash whenever possible.

As for tipping other services, there is not set standard for how much to tip but a little can go a long way. This Spain tipping guide will help you navigate when/where you can leave a little extra for great service.

Spain Tipping Guide

Cafe Server: If there is a tip jar by the cash register, it’s a nice gesture to leave a couple of coins. For exceptional table service, round up to the nearest €1. 

Restaurant Server: It is not customary to tip at a cheaper restaurant, ‘menu del dia,’ but a tip of up to 10 percent is acceptable at more upscale establishments. The tip is sometimes included in the final bill (IVA or Impuestos sobre el Valor Añadido), but not always. Check the bill first for these inclusions before deciding what to tip. Servers sometimes don’t receive tips included on a credit card, so always try to tip in cash whenever possible. 

Bartender: It’s not necessary to tip a bartender, as most do not expect it and some may even refuse it. Table service, however, is considered to be separate, and it is considerate to round to the nearest €1 for great service.

Taxis: A tip isn’t expected, but is appreciated. A good rule of thumb is to round up to the nearest euro or up to 10 percent of the final fare for exceptional service. Drivers typically charge a bag fee, so there is no need to tip for help with luggage. 

Airport Shuttle: It is not necessary to tip your driver, but feel free to give €1 per bag if they help with your luggage.

Doorman: Gratitude is always welcome when a doorman assists with luggage or hailing transportation. A simple thank you is appreciated, but feel free to offer €1 for exceptional service.

Bellhop: It is customary to tip €1 to €2 per bag, depending on size, but no more than €5.

House Cleaning: Everything is typically included in the hotel bill, but feel free to leave €1 per night for a spotless stay.

Concierge: If the concierge goes above and beyond with helping you book reservations, giving you directions, and providing insider recommendations, it’s considerate to tip €5 to €10.

Stylist: It’s considerate, but not expected, to tip 10 percent of the final bill if you’re satisfied with the results.

Spa Service Provider: A tip isn’t expected, but you can leave up to 10 percent for anything that goes above and beyond your expectations.

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