Advertisement

When to Visit Berlin

by SmarterTravel Staff

Berlin is an affordable destination year-round, but it's wise to keep an eye on major events and trade shows before booking. Summer is the most popular time to visit, when families vacation and the weather is nice. Winter can be cold and snowy, but many people visit for the holiday festivities.

Spring and fall attract visitors from all over who enjoy fewer crowds, mild temperatures, and plenty of activities.

Advertisement
  • high season: June to August
  • low season: late October to February
  • shoulder season: September to mid-October, March to May

Weather Information

Berlin experiences four seasons, with an average annual temperature of about 48 degrees. Winters tend to be chilly with temperatures averaging a high of 37 degrees in December. Summers are typically clear and warm, with an average high of 73 degrees in July. Spring and fall can bring pleasant weather, with average highs of 55 degrees in April and October. About one quarter of the city's precipitation comes in the form of snow, and rain is possible any time of the year.

Crowd Information

Since Berlin covers such a large area, dense crowds are rarely an issue. However, more people may visit during certain festivals, including the Berlinale in February, the Carnival of Cultures in May and June, the Love Parade in July, the Berlin Marathon in September, and New Year's Eve.

Closure Information

Hotels remain open throughout the year. While many museums will close on Mondays, and shops will close for holidays such as Easter, Pentecost (50 days after Easter), and New Year's Day.

When to Save

Although prices remain fairly steady throughout the year, hotels are the least expensive during the low season, and prices tend to rise during major events, marathons, and conventions.

When to Book

Last-minute airfare is available throughout the year, but it's wise to book several months in advance if planning a visit during a major festival.

Information provided by the Berlin Tourism Organisation.

 
 
 
Read comments or add your own insight!
Please enable JavaScript to properly view and use this web site.