When to visit El Salvador

by SmarterTravel Staff

El Salvador is a year-round tropical destination. For the most part, it has two seasons that last six months each and are opposite to those in the northern hemisphere: summer, from November through April; and winter, from May through October. The country gets particularly busy around Christmas, Easter, and during special celebrations in August. In general, November through April tends to be a more popular time to visit, while July and August are the least popular. May, June, September, and October offer a good mix of pleasant weather, fewer crowds, and lower prices.

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  • high season: November to January, March to April
  • low season: July to August
  • shoulder season: February, May to June, September to October

Weather Information

El Salvador remains warm year-round. Days are sunny with temperatures averaging between 79 and 84 degrees. The coastal regions are a little hotter, with temperatures averaging between 86 and 90 degrees. During the winter, from May through October, the mountains see colder weather, but no snow.

Crowd Information

The busiest time for crowds is during the high season and when events and holidays occur, such as Holy Week at the end of March and Christmas and New Year's at the end of the year. National Party, a celebration honoring the capital city's patron saint, occurs in the first week of August and is also a very busy time. Although this is the biggest patron saint celebration, local cities celebrate their own town's patron saint on a smaller scale throughout the year.

Closure Information

Tourism services and attractions remain open year-round.

When to Save

The low and shoulder seasons are good times to visit to find lower hotel rates and airfares. The periods around the holidays, particularly in December, are the most expensive.

When to Book

Book hotels at least one month in advance for travel during the high season and other peak times.

Information provided by the Ministry of Tourism of El Salvador.

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