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When to visit Nebraska

by SmarterTravel Staff

Nebraska is a four-season destination, with many events and conventions to keep travelers busy. The most popular time to visit is between Memorial Day and Labor Day, when the weather is warm and kids are on break from school. Visitors come in the spring to witness the annual migration of the sandhill cranes in central Nebraska. The fall can be a pleasant time to travel for cooler temperatures and fewer crowds. Winter is the least popular time to visit, as the weather can delay flights and cause icy conditions, but hotel prices are considerably lower.

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  • high season: late May to early September
  • low season: November to February
  • shoulder season: March to mid-May, mid-September to October

Weather Information

Summer, spring, and fall are generally good times to travel. The summer brings warm, sunny days interspersed with heavy rains. The spring and fall experience dry and temperate weather. Winter can be cold, with temperatures hovering above freezing and snowstorms occurring regularly.

Crowd Information

The summer sees more crowds than any other season. Special events that also create high demand include the College World Series in June and Berkshire Hathway Stockholders meeting in May in Omaha. Huskers home football games are also busy times in Lincoln.

Closure Information

Some attractions, especially water and outdoor activities such as riverboat cruises, horseback rentals, and canoe and kayak rentals, close for the winter season.

When to Save

Although Nebraska can be an economical destination year-round, hotel prices are generally less expensive during the winter.

When to Book

Flexible travel plans may make it possible to take advantage of low last-minute airfares. However, those with a set schedule should book at least three weeks in advance to obtain lower prices and ensure availability, especially for travel during the high season.

Information provided by the Nebraska Division of Travel and Tourism.

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