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What We're Reading: World's Worst Tourism Slogans

Find out which embarrassing tourism slogans should have been scrapped from the start in our weekly roundup of travel news, blogs, and stories.

World's Worst Tourism Slogans

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We don't like to be mean. Fortunately, CNN Travel doesn't mind. It published a list of the world's most cringe-inducing tourism slogans. One that made it into the hall of shame is "Colombia, the only risk is wanting to stay," which puts a depressing spotlight on the destination's not-so-safe reputation. Check out the story on CNN Travel.

A (Hilarious) Account of Teaching English Overseas

Unbrave Girl's latest post, Eight Questions You Keep Asking Me About Teaching ESL Overseas, mixes wit with practical information. In response to a question about safety, she writes, "While I was happy I went, I still spent the better part of the year feeling frustrated and helpless. Luckily, though, nothing horrible happened to me to me. I didn't get sold into prostitution or have my passport taken away. And I was able to leave the country with both of my kidneys. Or at least I think I still have both of my kidneys. Is there some kind of test I can do to make sure I still have both of my kidneys, you guys?"

Start a Contest to Find the Cheapest Fare

BBC Travel is running a month-long series featuring "websites that will change the travel game in 2013." The latest installment: an overview of Flightfox, a start-up that helps travelers create "contests" in which travel experts compete to find the cheapest flight. According to the BBC, "Punch in your travel dates and destination and describe your ideal flight, such as economy-class seats without red-eye departures, and then pay a 'finder's fee' that's proportional to the complexity of the trip and the number of experts who research it (fees usually range from between $29 and $49 for a straightforward search)."

To put the site to the test, the BBC pretended to book a round-trip flight from Sydney to Geneva. A finder's fee was set at $39. The result? Success! Flightfox's experts turned up a flight 16 percent lower than what the author had found on his own: a ticket for just $1,169.

Would you give Flightfox a try?

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