What We're Reading: The Dirtiest City in America

Travel + Leisure released its list of the dirtiest cities in America, and the results have us shaking our heads. Get the scoop on this and other hot travel stories of the week below.

How to Pay for Your Vacation

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Budget Travel's story, How to Pay for Your Vacation, may initially sound foolish. (The answer, of course, is to exchange money for goods and services.) But there's more to it than that, as Budget Travel reveals. Suggested strategies include setting up a vacation savings account or purchasing a trip on layaway. (Although we advise against the latter.)

Where the Presidents Stay

Recent polls show that the inundation of recent poll results is getting out of hand. So we're happy to come across a POTUS-themed story that's gaffe-free and nonpartisan. Conde Nast Traveler is featuring a list of 13 hotels where U.S. presidents have stayed, including an 18th-century inn that's been visited by Washington and Jefferson, Reagan's "Western White House," and a Fairmont hotel that's hosted every president since Taft.

The Dirtiest City in America

Another nasty superlative has been slapped on an unwitting destination. This time, Travel + Leisure picked the dirtiest city in the U.S. based on a reader survey. While looking at this list, I found myself shaking my head; but maybe that's the point. Nothing stirs the pot (and musters up page views) quite like a good public shaming.

New York is the country's dirtiest city? Come on. The place has so many distinct neighborhoods that it's just illogical to make this kind of broad generalization about the Big Apple. And I wholly disagree with the number-two pick: New Orleans. If you've ever walked down Bourbon Street after city workers have hosed down every inch of the avenue in the early morning hours, you'd realize that the place is pretty clean considering all the revelry that goes on there.

See the whole list here. Do you agree or disagree with the picks? Share your opinion in the comments!

(Photo: Street Trash via Shutterstock)

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