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Base of Eiffel Tower, Paris, France (Photo: Rick Steves)

Without much fanfare, new all-business-class airline La Compagnie is up and running, with five weekly roundtrip flights between Newark and Paris/DeGaulle. And, at least so far, blow-your-mind promotional prices are still available:

The initial promotion, $2,011 roundtrip for two people, is available for at least some flights—for at least another month. In mid-September, the fares increase to $3,721 for two, which is still a good deal at $1,861 per person.

One-person fares through August start at $1,376, then increase to $1,861....read more»

Food: Mexican Food Platter (Photo: Thinkstock/Hemera)

Eating healthfully on the road is a challenge that gets the better of many travelers....read more»

Do you speed through security faster than you can say "take out your liquids" or do you hold up the line while you try to go through with your shoes on? Take our quiz and brag to all your friends about what a savvy flyer you are... or aren't....read more»

Hotel: Business Man with Luggage, Using Tablet (Photo: Shutterstock/Diego Cervo)

Connected travelers have two questions when it comes to hotel Wi-Fi. First, is it free? And second, how fast is it?

The pricing question is easily answered by visiting the hotel's website, or with a call to the hotel.

The second question is considerably more confounding, however. Generally, hotels describe their Internet access as "fast" or "broadband," and leave it at that. But such overly broad descriptors are as applicable to sluggish 3 Mbps (megabits per second) download speeds as they are to blazing-fast 50 Mbps speeds.

If you're transferring large files, Skyping, or streaming a Netflix video, the numbers matter. The difference between lower and higher speeds can be the difference between getting a headache and getting the job done.

Enter Hotel Wi-Fi Test, "a leading company for collecting, analyzing and distributing data about Wi-Fi quality in hotels around the world."

...read more»
(Photo: Capitol Building via Shutterstock)

Washington's new Silver Metrorail line will is now operating, and the Washington Flyer bus is ready to connect. Buses will run nonstop between the airport, arrivals level, door four, and the new Metro station at Wiehle-Reston East every 15 to 20 minutes between 6:00 am (7:45 on weekends) and 10:40 pm. The fare will be $5 each way. Buses feature onboard Wi-Fi and plenty of space for baggage.

Silver line trains will join the existing Orange line at East Falls Church, running through the central District on the combined Blue-Orange line routes and terminating on the Blue route at Largo Town Center. For now, Metrobus will still operate its 5A Dulles route to/from L'Enfant Plaza and the Rosslyn Metrorail station....read more»

Train: Orient-Express (Photo: Orient-Express Hotels (UK) Ltd./Ron Bambridge)

Summer's not over yet, and a bevy of seasonal rail deals for Europe travel are available for the taking. Here are some of the best ones we've seen so far.

Free Day of Rail Travel

Buy any BritRail Pass or BritRail England Pass by August 31, travel within six months of purchase, and enjoy an extra day of pass validity at no extra cost. That's the current promotion from ACP Rail; you can buy direct or through your travel agent....read more»

Rear of Airplane Landing at Sunset (Photo: Thinkstock/iStock)

Since beefing up consumer-protection rules in 2010, the number of citations issued against U.S. airlines by the Department of Transportation has nearly doubled.

That's according to the L.A. Times, which reviewed federal records for the 2010 - 2013 period.

After the more stringent rules were put in place, the average number of citations rose to an average of 54 per year, versus 28 per year previously....read more»

When Girard, a new restaurant in the Fishtown neighborhood of Philadelphia, opens in September, its name will be added to a growing list of dining establishments notable for their adoption of a trending policy: no tipping.

In Girard's case, restaurant workers will be paid a percentage of the restaurant's profits, in addition to their hourly wages....read more»

(Photo: Thinkstock/iStock)

A recent posting on Just the Flight warned travelers of 40 tourist scams prevalent around the world. Wow—that's a long checklist. Fortunately, many of the 40 are "variations on a theme," and a comparable posting of 10 scams from Cheapflights.com is more realistic. Yes, none of the 10 or even the 40 is really new or innovative, but they bear repeating, anyhow.

Fake Police: A street merchant may put something in your hand or around your wrist, then, when you try to give it back, complain that you're trying to steal it. A uniformed policeman—fake—happens to be passing by and threatens to arrest you if you don't pay for what you supposedly stole. Variations include trumped-up arguments with taxi drivers and merchants. 

Fake Valuables: A vendor on a Bogota street offers to sell you "emeralds" at a fraction of the going price. A related scam: You're standing in line to buy a ticket for something and someone offers to sell you a "better" ticket and avoid the line....read more»

Single Suitcase on Luggage Carousel (Photo: Thinkstock/iStock)

JetBlue is changing its ticket-pricing policy next year, and fees for first checked bags will presumably accompany those changes.

Over the weekend, JetBlue's Chief Financial Officer Mark Powers told Bloomberg News, "There is a construct under which we would, in effect, be able to charge for bags."

JetBlue, said Powers, is in the process of creating fare "families" or "bundles" that would each include a specific set of services. Get ready for some confusing fare bundling, everyone.

Powers is talking about implementing a tiered pricing policy similar to that used by airlines such as Frontier and Spirit. Many so-called low-cost carriers offer competitively priced base fares, then tack on additional fees for everything from bags to seat assignments to bookings made by phone. You can either pay for the little extras or buy a more expensive type of ticket that includes 'em. Either way, you're paying. ...read more»

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